The North American Free Trade Agreement was negotiated behind closed doors with hundreds of corporate advisors. Its key provisions promote job outsourcing and empower corporations to sue the U.S. government before three corporate lawyers to obtain uncapped sums of money from taxpayers for domestic environmental and other policies the corporations oppose. This deal between the United States, Mexico and Canada was used as the model for the TPP, a deal widespread public opposition derailed last year.

At the heart of NAFTA are rights for thousands of multinational corporations to sue the U.S., Canadian and Mexican governments before a panel of three corporate lawyers, who can award the corporations unlimited sums to be paid by us, the …

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Since NAFTA went into effect in 1994, almost one million U.S. jobs have been certified as lost to NAFTA, by just one narrow government program.…

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NAFTA guts “Buy American” and “Buy Local” polices. NAFTA’s procurement chapter requires that all firms operating in Mexico and Canada be provided the same access to U.S. government procurement contracts as U.S. firms get – outsourcing U.S. tax dollars and

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Since NAFTA, food imports from Mexico and Canada have surged 194 percent, overwhelming border food inspectors. NAFTA also explicitly limited border food safety inspection and required us to accept food imports that do not meet U.S. safety standards. This most

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Environmental protections are threatened by the terms at the heart of NAFTA that empower thousands of multinational corporations to drag governments to a tribunal of three corporate lawyers to demand unlimited taxpayer compensation if they think a country’s environmental, conservation, …

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NAFTA devastated Mexico’s rural sector, destroyed tens of thousands of small businesses, harmed workers, and forced many to leave their homeland.…

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Canada has been slammed by the North American Free Trade Agreement’s (NAFTA) corporate tribunals that empower multinational corporations to sue governments before a panel of three corporate lawyers who can award the corporations unlimited sums of money to be paid

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